This week’s movie releases

This week’s movie releases

FILM: TAMMY
CAST: Melissa Mccarthy, Susan Sarandon, ALLISON JANNEY, GARY COLE, MARK DUPLASS, DAN AYKROYD, KATHY BATES, Sandra OH
DIRECTOR: BEN FALCONE

Tammy (Melissa McCarthy) is having a bad day. She’s totalled her clunker car, gotten fired from her thankless job at a greasy burger joint, and instead of finding comfort at home, finds her husband getting comfortable with the neighbour in her own house.
It’s time to take her boom box and book it. The bad news is she’s broke and without wheels. The worse news is her grandma, Pearl (Susan Sarandon), is her only option – with a car, cash, and an itch to see Niagara Falls. Not exactly the escape Tammy had in mind. But on the road, with Pearl riding shotgun, it may be just what Tammy needs.
Road trips are a tradition of comedy films, but in the hands of married duo Ben Falcone and McCarthy, their new movie, ‘Tammy’, is anything but a traditional road trip.

Falcone and McCarthy have been writing comedy material together since their early days as Groundlings, where they met. ‘Tammy’ marks the couple’s first collaboration on the big screen as writers. It is also Falcone’s feature directorial debut, and McCarthy’s first foray into producing.
“I guess you could say it was literally a dream come true,” says Falcone, who reveals that the idea sprang from a dream he described to McCarthy about going on a crazy road trip with her grandmother. “I always love writing with Melissa, but to get to direct her was incredible because she’s so talented and, of course, funny.”
McCarthy shares, “Ben and I had always talked about writing a movie about real people who mess up and have to decide if they are going to keep making mistakes or change things. Since Ben has been directing theatre and comedy videos for years, we felt it was a natural progression for him to direct ‘Tammy’.”

Falcone and McCarthy mined their own Midwest backgrounds to create a string of colourful characters and situations that revolve around a working-class woman who gets trapped on an interminable road trip with her rather atypical grandmother.
Co-producer Will Ferrell was already a fan of Falcone and McCarthy and were eager to work with the pair.
“Melissa has made me laugh hard for a long time, so when I heard it was her and Susan Sarandon in a car having wild adventures, I wanted in,” says Ferrell.
Sarandon, who stars opposite McCarthy as Tammy’s irrepressible grandma, Pearl, was drawn to the raucous road trip that Tammy and her grandmother take, which, surprisingly, becomes an emotional journey. “The script had such energy and was flamboyant in its freedom,” she conveys. “I liked that all the absurd things they go through give Pearl and Tammy the opportunity to look at where they are in their lives and take it up a notch.”

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FILM: DIE SPOOK VAN UNIONDALE
CAST: Ivan Zimmermann, Tanya Van Graan, Tobie Cronjé, Adam Tas
DIRECTOR: Pierre Smith

Stefan (Adam Tas) is a young businessman who is on his way to visit his folks in the beautiful Baviaanskloof. When is car breaks down near the small town of Uniondale his Easter plans change drastically. He eventually manages to get to Willowmore, where he stays until his car gets fixed. There he meets some eerie characters and he learns about the legend of the ghost of Uniondale – the story of Johan (Ivan Zimmermann) and Marie (Tanya van Graan) who was inseparable from childhood and eventually got married and whose story ends tragically. Stefan also meets a young girl in the town, Sonja (Nelda Janse van Rensburg) and the chemistry between them is undeniable…

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FILM: LOVELACE
CAST: Amanda Seyfried, Peter Sarsgaard, HANK AZARIA, BOBBY CANNAVALE, SHARON STONE, WES BENTLEY, ADAM BRODY, JAMES FRANCO
DIRECTOR: ROB EPSTEIN AND JEFFREY FRIEDMAN

From Academy Award winning directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman (‘Howl’, ‘The Celluloid Closet’) comes the true story of fame, abuse and betrayal set against the sexual revolution of the 1970s.

In 1972 – before the internet, before the porn explosion – ‘Deep Throat’ was a phenomenon: the first scripted pornographic theatrical feature film, featuring a story, some jokes, and an unknown and unlikely star, Linda Lovelace (Amanda Seyfried). Escaping a strict religious family, Linda discovered freedom and the highlife when she fell for and married charismatic hustler Chuck Traynor (Peter Sarsgaard). As Linda Lovelace she became an international sensation – less centrefold fantasy than a charming girl-next-door with an impressive capacity for fellatio. Fully inhabiting her new identity, Linda became an enthusiastic spokesperson for sexual freedom and uninhibited hedonism. Six years later she presented another, utterly contradictory, narrative to the world – and herself as the survivor of a far darker story.

Epstein and Friedman’s compassion in depicting complex characters, combined with detailed and engaging storytelling, made the captivating life story of Linda Lovelace a perfect subject for their second feature. “Linda had an amazing life, and she was a pivotal cultural figure at a time when society’s sexual awareness was really blossoming,” says Epstein. “There’s the period we think of as the sexual revolution, which segues into the rise of feminism, and Linda was an important character in both those instances.”

After a lengthy dinner meeting with Epstein and Friedman, Seyfried was impressed by the directors’ “perfect vision and meticulous preparation.” It became clear to the actress that she was going to completely commit to making this character come to life. “This was the first time I’ve stepped out of my comfort zone, and playing someone that existed comes with a lot of responsibility,” says Seyfried.
“Linda worked so hard for so many years for someone to listen and to find a voice that was going to be heard. It’s a tale of survival, and it was important to me to validate everything she went through, because it is told through her point of view.”